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Department of Environmental Conservation

Sustainable Solutions to Problems Affecting Honey Bee Health (II)

During bloom, pesticide use pattern is changing rapidly in many crops owing to phase-outs of some chemistries and introduction of new ones. In cranberry, two new fungicides now dominate applications of choice during bloom; the recommendation is to use the two modes of action simultaneously to slow evolution of resistance by fungal pest species. In order to save time and money, growers frequently add an insecticide simultaneously to the fungicide mix in order to manage the key pest, cranberry fruitworm. Alone, all of the compounds are considered 'bee safe' and bloom sprays are allowed.

Forest Conservation

The proposal team of the Universities of Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont and Cornell aim to help stabilize the forested land base by working to ensure that a significant proportion of FFO lands are passed from one generation of landowners to the next with minimal amount of forest conversion and parcelization. The research component of this project will use landowner interviews and a mail survey to better understand how FFOs make decisions about the future of their land.

Understanding the Factors that Influence Outdoor Residential Water Conservation: A Case Study in Suburban Boston

Urbanization has increased demand for water and impaired aquatic ecosystems, threatening water resources worldwide. Climate change and more frequent droughts are expected to exacerbate this situation. Residential landscaping, especially lawns, are a major factor in increasing domestic water use.

Outreach efforts have been made to promote outdoor residential water conservation and promote methods that provide ecosystem benefits. These include water harvesting using rain barrels, infiltrating storm water using rain gardens, and landscaping with native plants.

Biological Control of Arthropod Pests and Weeds

Classical biological control provides a sustainable, green method of controlling invasive pests permanently. The number of such pests increases yearly with each new invasion. The separate objectives in this project address a series of such invaders. The intended outcome of each objective (project) is to safely and permanently lower the density of the pest and avoid the damage it causes. Outcomes will be healthier forests and other natural ecosystems and reduced pesticide use in crops.

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