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Keeping Quality Forecast Archive

Format: 2021

2013 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2013 is for VERY POOR keeping quality.

We calculated 2 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast. We were awarded 1 point for February sunshine hours and 1 point for April precipitation.

What does this mean?  If you take no steps to manage fruit rot disease, you could end up with a high incidence of fruit rot at harvest and particularly during storage of the fruit.  Inoculum produced during the current growing season might exponentially increase during the following year, meaning that more fungicide applications will be required to reduce the inoculum load for subsequent crops. Careful disease management this season can overcome this prediction.

This is a year that you should definitely not reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications. If you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can still reduce your fungicide inputs in spite of the forecast.

If you have any questions, you can call me at 774-238-0698 or email me at fcaruso@umass.edu if you have any specific questions or concerns about a particular bed. I'll be driving cross-country from July 3-9, and I'll be moving westward in time zones, concluding in the Pacific Zone (3 hours difference).

Frank L. Caruso, Extension Plant Pathologist

2013 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

As of April 1, there is only 1 point out of a possible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2013 Massachusetts cranberry crop. The sole point was awarded for favorable sunshine hours in February. Consequently, the forecast is for POOR keeping quality. The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May. Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the rate of fungicides applied should NOT be reduced, and close attention should be paid where fruit rot has been a major or regular concern. This should be a good year for holding late water because we have had a more typical winter, avoiding severe temperatures along with adequate water for the winter flood and sufficient snow cover over long stretches of time. Minimal ice sanding was done this winter due to a lack of sufficient ice thickness beyond a few days. Sanding is one of the best cultural control strategies, as it covers overwintering inoculum, so the lack of sanding resulted in a minimal reductive effect. At any rate, expect the worst regarding fruit rot in what appears to be a much more typical growing season than we had in 2012. If you have any questions, please contact me (extension 18) or Carolyn (extension 25).

FRANK CARUSO,
EXTENSION PLANT PATHOLOGIST

2012 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2012 is for VERY POOR keeping quality if fungicides or late water are not used. We calculated 2 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast. We were awarded 1 point for March precipitation and 1 point for April precipitation. This is a year that you should definitely not reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications. If you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can still reduce your fungicide inputs in spite of the forecast. As usual, call me if you have any specific questions or concerns about a particular bed. 

Frank L. Caruso, Extension Plant Pathologist

2012 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

As of April 1, there is only 1 point out of a possible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2012 Massachusetts cranberry crop. The sole point was awarded for favorable rainfall in March. Consequently, the forecast is for POOR keeping quality. The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May. Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the rate of fungicides applied should NOT be reduced, and close attention should be paid where fruit rot has been a major or regular concern. Carolyn did not recommend holding late water because of the earliness of the season – we are running about 23-25 days ahead of a normal schedule. At this point it is too late to start late water. There are several factors that could also help contribute to higher levels of fruit rot in 2012. Minimal sanding was done this winter due to a lack of ice. Sanding is one of the best cultural control strategies, as it covers overwintering inoculum. The mild temperatures probably resulted in a reduced mortality of a certain percentage of this overwintering inoculum as well. Should this drought pattern continue (we are currently 7 inches below normal for precipitation for the year), this will be another stress on the plants, possibly contributing to higher levels of fungal infection during bloom. Warmer than average temperatures will only continue this trend of increased susceptibility of the cranberry vines. At any rate, expect the worst regarding fruit rot in what appears to be a very odd growing season. If you have any questions, please contact me (extension 18) or Carolyn (extension 25). 

Frank Caruso, Plant Pathology

2011 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2011 is for POOR keeping quality. We calculated 4 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast. We were awarded 1 point for sunshine hours in February, 2 points for March sunshine hours, and 1 point for March precipitation. We received no additional points beyond the Preliminary KQF. This is a year that you should probably not reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications. If you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can still reduce your fungicide inputs in spite of the forecast. As usual, call me if you have any specific questions or concerns about a particular bed. 

Frank Caruso, Plant Pathology

2011 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

The forecast is for FAIR TO GOOD keeping quality. As of April 1, there are 4 points out of a possible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2011 Massa-chusetts cranberry crop. The 4 points were awarded for favorable sunshine hours in February (1 point), favorable sunshine hours in March (2 points) and
favorable rainfall in March (1 point). The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May. Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the
rate of fungicides applied could be reduced, but only in those situations where fruit rot has not been a major issue.

As for the holding of late water, there are no negative indicators that rule against doing it this spring. Growers should determine whether to hold late water based on bed condition: was the bed sanded (and there are some
of these), does the bed show visible winter injury or other stresses (there may be some yellow vine syndrome showing up at this point) and was fruit rot incidence high in 2010? There should be minimal winter injury to vines because most beds were properly flooded with good snow and ice cover during the periods of coldest temperatures. Check the section on late water in the Chart Book for advice regarding whether to use this cultural practice. If you have any questions, please contact me (extension 18) or Carolyn
(extension 25).

Frank Caruso, Plant Pathology

2010 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2010 is for GOOD keeping quality.

We calculated 7 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast. We were awarded 4 points for sunshine hours for the 2009 growing season, 1 point for February sunshine hours, 1 point for April precipitation and 1 point for May precipitation. This is a year that you should probably be able to reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications. If you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can reduce your fungicide inputs in that situation as well. As usual, call me at 508-295-2212 X 18 if you have any specific questions or concerns about a particular bed.

2010 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

As of April 1, there are 5 points out of a possible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2010 Massachusetts cranberry crop. The 5 points were awarded for favorable sunshine hours from the previous year (4 points) and 1 point was awarded for favorable sunshine hours in February. The forecast is for GOOD keeping quality. The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May. Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the rate of fungicides applied could be reduced.

As for the holding of late water, because we are currently two weeks ahead of normal plant phenological development, it is too late to start flooding for late water unless the bed was already flooded in the heavy rains of March 29-30. If the bed still has a significant depth of water, the vines should be totally submerged (see page 3). As for flood duration, call Carolyn DeMoranville (x 25) for advice. Check the section on late water in the Chart Book for advice regarding general information on this cultural practice. If you have any questions regarding the forecast, please contact Frank Caruso at x18.

2009 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2009 is for POOR keeping quality on bogs where no steps are taken to control fungal diseases.

How did we calculate the forecast? Only 4 of a possible 16 points were achieved this season - 2 for March sunshine (above threshold), 1 for March precipitation (below threshold) and 1 for April precipitation (below threshold).

What does this mean for your bog? It is critical that you properly manage fungal diseases. You should use full recommended rates and numbers of applications for fruit rot fungicides. However, if you held late water, fungicide inputs may be reduced as outlined in the Chart Book.

As usual, call me if you have specific questions or concerns about a particular bed.

2009 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

The forecast is for FAIR keeping quality. As of April 1, there are 3 points out of a pos-sible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2009 Massachusetts cranberry crop. The 3 points were awarded for favorable sunshine hours in March (2 points) and 1 point was awarded for lower rainfall amounts in March. The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May. Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the rate of fungicides applied should not be reduced.

As for the holding of late water, there are no definitive indicators pro or con. Growers should determine whether to hold late water based on bed condition: Was the bed sanded (and there are many of these)? Does the bed show visible winter injury or other stresses (there may be some yellow vine syndrome showing up at this point)? Was fruit rot incidence high in 2008? There should be minimal winter injury to vines because most beds were properly flooded at the periods of coldest temperatures. Check the section on late water in the Chart Book for advice regarding whether to use this cultural practice. If you have any questions, 
please contact me. 

2008 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2008 is for FAIR TO GOOD keeping quality.

We calculated 5 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast. We were awarded 1 point for February sunshine, 2 points for March sunshine, 1 point for April precipitation and 1 point for May precipitation. This is a year that you probably should not reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications. However, if you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can reduce your fungicide inputs in that situation.

2008 Preliminary Keeping Quality Forecast

As of April 1, there are 3 points out of a possible 10 that favor keeping quality for the 2008 Massachusetts cranberry crop.  The 3 points were awarded for favorable sunshine hours in February (1 point) and March (2 points).  The forecast is for FAIR keeping quality.  The final keeping quality forecast (issued after June 1) could be upgraded if we have a cool and dry April and May.  Based on the present forecast, fungicide applications and the rate of fungicides applied should not be reduced.

As for the holding of late water, there are no definitive indicators pro or con.  Growers should determine whether to hold late water based on bed condition: was the bed sanded, does the bed show visible winter injury or other stresses (we did experience a drought last summer and there is a reasonable amount of yellow vine syndrome showing up at this point) and was fruit rot incidence high in 2007?  There was very little sanding done this winter and there should be minimal winter injury to vines.  Check the section on late water in the Chart Book for advice regarding whether to use this cultural practice.

2007 Final Keeping Quality Forecast

The Keeping Quality Forecast for June 2007 is for POOR keeping quality.

We calculated 3 of a possible 16 points to arrive at this forecast.  This is the fewest points we have had since 2002 (when we had one point!).  We were awarded 2 points for March sunshine and 1 point for May precipitation.  This is a year that you should not reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of fungicide applications.  However, if you have a bed that had late water held this spring, you can reduce your fungicide inputs in that situation.

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