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Radishes

Watermelon Radish

Produce Spotlight on Radishes

Radishes are a root vegetable that come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. They are low in calories, full of fiber, and are a good source of vitamin C, potassium, and folate. These nutrients keep our digestive system healthy, boost our immune system, and help our tissues and muscles work properly.

 

Shopping for radishes

Select radishes that are colorful, smooth, shiny, and firm. Tops should be bright green and healthy. Avoid radishes withlarge cracks, wrinkled skin, or a soft and spongy texture. Avoid faded or wilting tops.  Select bunches with bulbs of a similar size. Radishes have a long season in New England, stretching from May through November. 

 

Common Types

Globe/Spring – small, golf ball shape; red, purple, pink, or white; usually mild but are sometimes spicy  

Daikon –  larger, long, and white; popular in Asian cuisine; eaten raw, cooked, or pickled; sweet, slightly spicy flavor; tender when cooked

Watermelon – named for its appearance not taste; small-to-medium and round; greenish-white skin, deep purple inside; tender with some crunch, and mild flavor

Black – Large, ball-shaped; rough black skin, pearl white inside; crunchy, and very spicy flavor

 

Storage and Preparation

  • Store radishes in the refrigerator. Discard tops and place radishes in a plastic bag layered with damp paper towels to prevent drying out. Store for one to two weeks. Rinse before eating to remove any dirt.  
  • To freeze, first slice radishes, blanch (boil for two to three minutes then cool immediately in ice water), then drain. Place in freezer bags, label with date, and place in to the freezer.

 

Serving Ideas

  • Eat radishes raw; thinly sliced on salads, shredded in coleslaw, or paired with a dip like hummus.
  • Eat radishes cooked; roast or bake  with other vegetables, boil in soups or stews, or add to a stir fry.  

 

Radish Math

1 pound of radishes = about 2 cups sliced and 2 ½ cups diced = 4 servings

 

Using Locally Grown Produce

Visit the UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program’s website featuring recipes using fruits and vegetables. To locate places to buy local produce, visit www.mass.gov/massgrown.