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  • Paul Travers, discovering bioactive natural products and their biosynthetic pathways from diverse plant species in culture.

    Stories of Six Summer Scholars

    Student Success in Extension and Research

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    Lindiwe Sibeko: Committed to Improving Women’s Health

  • Gypsy moth damage to tree in Hanson, MA June, 2016. Photo by Deborah Swanson

    Gypsy Moth Outbreak in Massachusetts, 2016

    Largest outbreak since 1981

Paul Travers, discovering bioactive natural products and their biosynthetic pathways from diverse plant species in culture.

Stories of Six Summer Scholars

Student Success in Extension and Research

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Linda MacIntosh variety
Sep 21, 2016

Location, location, location. Apparently, this factor for success applies to both real estate and apple trees. Considering the many challenges that fruit tree growers faced during the summer of 2016 with a decimated peach crop and extended drought, at least there is good news for apple aficionados. Jon Clements, UMass Extension educator and fruit specialist, keeps a close watch on orchards across the state. He said, “The overall crop in Massachusetts is down about 20% from average, but it varies widely from orchard to orchard.

Drought resistant cultivar lower right corner
Sep 1, 2016

At UMass’s Joseph Troll Turf Research Center in South Deerfield, the researchers are doing some of the worrying for you. When most people they drive by the Research Center, what they see is a lush green lawn. What they may not realize is that these 20 green acres are home to an extensive field of research that many of us benefit from without even knowing it. The primary focus of UMass research at the Research Center is the conservation and protection of one of our most precious natural resources: water.

Clubroot gall in Nepal
Aug 23, 2016

Rob Wick, professor of plant pathology and nematology in the Stockbridge School of Agriculture, was invited by USAID and Winrock (a leader in U.S. and international development with a focus on agricultural issues) to help farmers curb clubroot disease of brassica crops in Nepal. Clubroot is a serious soil-borne disease that affects brassica crops. Farmers cannot easily eliminate this disease, but they can learn methods for controlling the spread of infested plants and soil. This is a serious growing issue that needs systematic intervention and Wick was tapped to help them.

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