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  • Norman Rockwell painting of Extension agents

    UMass Extension: At Your Service for 100 Years

    Three Retired Cooperative Extension Agents Offer Snapshots of the Past

  • New name for the Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment

    Why the New Name?

    Why Have We Added “Food and the Environment” To Our Name?

  • Nick Brazee checks monitor for internal decay of living trees

    Tomography: A Tool to Read Trees That Predict the Future

    Tree Diagnostics

Norman Rockwell painting of Extension agents

UMass Extension: At Your Service for 100 Years

Three Retired Cooperative Extension Agents Offer Snapshots of the Past

Welcome to Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment

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Former and current Extension Faculty and staff gather

A century of community education, outreach and service through UMass Extension was marked at a celebratory gathering on September 26, 2014 on the UMass Amherst campus. Retired and current faculty and staff, students, government officials, community partners and regional farmers gathered for what was truly a “once in a lifetime“ event at the University’s flagship campus, site of Extension’s founding back when UMass was known as Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC).

Screen shot of census web page

Every five years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) conducts a census of farming, working to document the facts about every farm in the country, down to the state and county level. The results of the Agricultural Census provide the most complete picture we have of the directions agriculture is moving and the trends that are emerging. Now there’s an alternative way to sample the results. With the help of our colleagues in UMass Amherst’s Department of Resource Economics, we’ve posted our own tables, charts and some interpretation of the results on our website.

Newton 4-H club: Visual Presentation Awards: Jennifer Buras, Katharine Axon, Daisy Proskauer, Elena Morris Kelly

It is not hard to hear the enthusiasm for 4-H in Michael Buras’s voice as it spills out of the telephone. Early in 2013, he helped to start a new club that young members have named, “Plant a Smile.”  Just as most good efforts get started, this one began with a great 4-H experience. Buras’ youngest daughter attended a summer camp and encouraged the formation of a permanent 4-H club in her hometown.

In a very short time, this club has grown to involve eight girls, 12 year olds, who are dedicated to the projects they undertake. Initially, they planted a lot of flowers, vegetables, and shrubs, quickly growing into their chosen name.