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Cranberry IPM Message

Just a short message this week. Flea beetles are out. Belay, Sevin and Diazinon are good choices to control flea beetle.  The Entomology lab reports that several growers have already put out sprays to control this pest.  There is also some talk and concern about a third generation of blackheaded fireworm showing, so be on the look out on problem or suspect bogs.

From the Entomology Lab: Keep in mind that Belay is only being recommended for cranberry weevil; it is a better choice than Actara for weevil management. Black-headed fireworm, cranberry fruitworm and Spag are on the Belay label but will likely only suppress at the 4 oz rate.

If you are planning to spray for weevils, you should do so soon. Scout, assess, and treat; don’t wait. Reports of cranberry fruitworm pressure (in terms of unhatched, viable eggs) has been variable; some high numbers and some low. Try to use a magnifier when inspecting the calyx end of the fruit for unhatched viable eggs.

Belay is a new insecticide that targets summer generation cranberry weevil. You may apply it twice per season not to exceed 12 oz/A. Belay is very toxic to bees—spray post bloom! We have heard reports of very high numbers of weevil during the past week (50+ on average). Belay can be used in Zone II and is a viable alternative for weevil control.

Many first fruitworm sprays have gone out already and some growers may be through their two sprays before July 4th.  This is certainly way ahead of normal scheduling.  Late varieties on State Bog hit 50% oob late this week.  The second treatment goes out about 10 days after the first application, if you are using the standard fruitworm practice.  As fruits set, begin inspecting 50 randomly...

Clean Sweep Consulting reported sightings of second generation black-headed fireworm; the larvae are out.  Plan your management based on moth flight and choice of compounds.  Brown spanworm larvae may start to show up soon.  Look for thin, thread-like larvae on the rim of the sweep net.  Check pheromone traps weekly and change lures about every 3-4 weeks as needed.  Several of our new products...

Final Keeping Quality Forecast is for GOOD quality.  Frank has calculated that we obtained 7 out of 16 points for this year.  You should probably be able to reduce your fungicide rates and/or the number of applications.  If you use Abound, it does have a 14-day water holding requirement.  Frank has mentioned that he has had conservations with the manufacturer to get this changed, but it is not...

Bees are coming out onto the bogs so exercise caution with all pesticide sprays.  We have had reports of more than 100 BHF moths caught in a trap.  Intrepid is pollinator safe but it is Zone 2 restricted.  Be sure to check the Chart Book to make sure you are waiting the proper intervals between sprays and observing the correct water holding times as needed.  If using Intrepid or Confirm for...

Black-headed fireworm moths have been caught in traps.  We saw our first one on Monday of this week.  When treating the summer generation with Intrepid or Confirm, timing is 2 weeks from the onset of flight, so you must be monitoring now!!  The second spray would follow 10 days later.  If using conventional insecticides, apply 10 days after peak moth flight, which is usually during bloom. ...

The good news is that we have not yet seen any black-headed fireworm moths in our traps yet.  If you have not done so, get your pheromone traps out as soon as you can.  Stevens uprights collected yesterday are at hook.  We could see scattered bloom next week, especially if the warm weather continues.

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