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Fruit Program News

ReTain Recommendations for Harvest Management -- Apples (and pears and peaches)

From Jim Wargo, Valent USA

Thanks to Jim and UConn's Mary Concklin where these recommendations appeared in her e-mail newsletter...

ReTain Recommendations -- Apples

A reminder that ReTain can be used on peach, nectarine, and plum for harvest management and improvement of fruit quality. From the ReTain label: Depending on cultivar, orchard conditions, and grower objectives, one or more of the following benefits will be associated with using ReTain on peach, nectarine, or plum:

• Improved harvest management

• Additional time for increase in fruit size

• Maintenance of fruit firmness

• Reduced preharvest fruit drop

• Improved fruit quality

• Enhanced storage potential

Apply one pouch per acre of ReTain to peach, nectarine, or plum one to two weeks prior to the anticipated beginning of the normal harvest period* of untreated fruit. ReTain efficacy requires that fruit and foliage receive thorough spray coverage. To ensure thorough coverage adjust water volumes based on tree size and spacing and use calibrated spray equipment (i.e., orchard air blast sprayer). Excessive spray application volumes that result in spray runoff will reduce product performance. In most cases, 100 gallons per acre has been shown to be effective.  For optimal response, use ReTain with a 100% organosilicone surfactant. Use a final surfactant concentration of 0.05 to 0.1% (v/v) in the spray tank. To reduce foaming, add the adjuvant last and minimize agitation.

*The normal harvest period for a particular orchard block refers to that time when fruits not treated with ReTain would be harvested. To help determine the beginning of the normal harvest period, refer to historical trends for harvest dates and the “days from full bloom to harvest” interval for each cultivar in your area, and closely monitor the fruit maturity development for the current season.

ReTain label 08/01/2019

With the heat wave and dry spell broken, for now, we are seeing an increase in SWD numbers in our monitoring traps.  This means, of course, it's time to make sure you are up to speed on your management practices! Check out the Quick and Dirty SWD Recommendations for an overview and links to more detailed information.

quick_and_dirty_swd_recs_.pdf  

swd male

As fruit ripen they become susceptible to spotted wing drosophila (SWD) infestation. Right now that includes strawberries, and very soon cherries and blueberries. Followed not long after by peaches and nectarines. We are catching SWD in traps! For the latest SWD management information, see the SWD sidebar link or click here. Here are direct links to insecticide recommendations for small fruit and stone fruit. Good luck!

Fruit twilight meeting, Tuesday, June 11, 2019. 5:30 PM. Bashista Orchards, 160 East Street, Southampton, MA. 2 pesticide re-certification credits. Light supper served, no pre-registration necessary but $20 registration collected at the door. Meeting stars and UMass Amherst Faculty Autio, Cooley, and Pinero will speak on current horticulture, disease, and insect management. Extension Educators Clements, Schloemann, and Garofalo co-star.

Fruit twilight meeting, Wednesday, June 12, 2019. 5:30 PM. Tougas Family Farm, 234 Ball Street, Northboro, MA. 2 pesticide re-certification credits. Light supper served, no pre-registration necessary but $20 registration collected at the door. In cooperation with University of Rhode Island Extension and Rhode Island Fruit Growers' Association. Meeting stars and UMass Amherst Faculty Autio, Cooley, and Pinero will speak on current horticulture, disease, and insect management. Extension Educators Clements, Schloemann, Garofalo and Faubert (URI) co-star.

This from an e-mail from Cornell's Terence Robinson dated May 1, 2019.

"Today we are pleased to announce the official release of the 2019 Carbohdyrate thinning model on NEWA and the official release of a new phone app for IOS and android.  The phone app has the carbohydrate model, the fruit growth rate model and the apple irrigation model."

Bloom Thinning with the Pollen Tube Growth Model (PTGM)

Mike Basedow, CCE-ENYCHP & Dan Donahue CCE-ENYCHP

Reprinted from Cornell ENYCHP Tree Fruit E-Alert, Donahue and Basedow, for April 30th, 2019 @ 10:00 am

We trialed the PTGM thinning protocol in ENY orchards in 2018 to mixed results. Spray timings are critical (hours, not days), and inclement weather can interfere. Trials have been set up in Ulster, Columbia, and Clinton Counties for 2019.

NEWA announces partnership with Onset Corporation. The New York State IPM Program at Cornell University is pleased to announce that Onset Corporation has joined the NEWA family and will be partnering to integrate HOBO® weather station data used by growers for use with insect pest and plant disease decision support tools at http://newa.cornell.edu.

Once again current tree fruit bud stages at the UMass Orchard in Belchertown, MA, including pictures, are available on the UMass Fruit Advisor website: http://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/bud-stages-photos Every year since 2012, a history of current bud stages are also available. In addition, bud stages back to 2001 are archived in Clements Corner on the old UMass Fruit Advisor website here: http://fruitadvisor.info/tfruit/clements/index.html

netfmg cover

The New England Tree Fruit Management Guide, a collaborative publication of tree fruit Extension specialists in each New England state, is available on-line or in print. For New England commercial orchardists, the on-line version at http://netreefruit.org is updated continuously and represents the latest tree fruit production and crop protectant information. It is both desktop and mobile device friendly, and can be a quick handy reference in the field on your smart phone. Individual chapters/sections can also be easily printed for quick reference in the office, spray shed, or for workers. This should be your first go-to for current orchard -- including apple, pear, peach, cherry, and plum -- production and spray schedule information. For those wishing a fully printed guide in reference book form, one can be ordered here: https://www.umassextensionbookstore.com/products/29

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